Wednesday, September 06, 2006

For the Romantic in you...or not

Please remember that you have two choices for this blog:

(1) Analyze the Longfellow poem given in class ("The Cross of Snow" or "The Tide Rises the Tide Falls"). Your interpretation should have a thesis and should be backed up with the techniques used in class on Wednesday.

(2) Compose your own Romantic poem using Romantic subject matter and form.

Please post by 10 pm Thursday night.

35 Comments:

Blogger amberh said...

In the poem “The Tide Rises, The Tide Falls” by Henry Longfellow, the theme of days coming and going is portrayed in great depth. This is evident when Longfellow repeats “the tide rises, the tide falls” three different times. Between each repetition there are a series of images that are occur daily on the beach, such as “…efface the foot prints in the sands,” the sea will always wash away footprints in the sand. Also, Longfellow uses the image of a traveler to show that days come and go. He does this by stating that the traveler is leaving the beach, and then is returning once more to start another day.

5:20 PM  
Blogger emily k said...

The tide rises and the tide falls. Each day a person is able to start over and live their life, while facing the facts. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow uses a rhyme scheme that shows the barriers. Call, fall, wall, and stall, they all symbolize a barrier that a person must break through in order to achieve his or her goals. Some of the other words that rhyme, hands and sands are more hopeful. A person can use their hands to further able them to strive, or help others. Sand is walked on many times but the ocean is able to “…efface the footprints in the sands.” There will always be a new slate for one to start over. The title, “The Tide Rises and the Tide Falls,” is emphasized through out the poem. An athlete may be famous but will soon be forgotten. As the tide rises, the athlete rises to the top. As the tide falls, the water washes away the memory of the once-famous athlete. The traveler represents the average person. They are reluctant to leave the place that makes them feel comfortable. They have to go home for the night and face reality of their daily life. The next day is new and the slate is clean, they come back to the place they feel comfortable.

6:01 PM  
Blogger CecilyJ said...

I think that in the poem "The Tide Rises, The Tide Falls" by Henry Longfellow the significence of the repeated line "the tide rises, the tide falls" is that each day some of the same things will always happen. The sun will always rise, and the tide will always rise and fall. People and our agendas will always change but some things will always be the same. In the poem Longfellow says "but nevermore returns the traveler to the shore." The traveler is one of the changing things. I believe that the traveler died on his journey however it could be that the traveler is just continuing on his journey. Longfellow leaves this up for interperatation. That sea will always be there for people to observe but will the traveler?

6:37 PM  
Blogger EmilyL said...

In the poem "The Tide Rises, The Tide Falls" it compares the rising and falling of the ocean tides to the rising and falling of the sun across the sky as each day passes. In the poem a traveler walks across the beach and that night the footprints are erased by the water. The next day the traveler returns and the tide continues to rise and fall. Alliteration is used in this poem in many places; “curlew calls”, “sea- sands”, “towards the town”, and “steeds in their stalls”. This brings out these words and allows the poem to flow smoothly. The rhythm is similar to the rise and fall of the water on the shore creating an image of the water’s movement. The rhyme scheme is end rhyme. The rhyming words that bring emphasis to the poem are falls, calls, walls, stalls, brown, town, hands, sands, nevermore, and shore. These words are very key to the theme of the poem and provide a picture. I agree with Emily K. when she says that the tide is like an athlete or someone of fame that rises to the top but fades away as time goes on. The tide will continue to rise and fall as well as “the day returns” everyday and that will never change. But those who walk on the shore will leave their mark that will soon be washed away by the tide.

7:53 PM  
Blogger karlak said...

The poem “The Tide Rises, The Tide Falls” by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow has many important parts of Romanticism. The major thing is that it’s about nature, mostly being the ocean’s tide. It also has the dark side of Romanticism and is in a way depressing because it talks about darkness and how the traveler never comes back to the shore. The poem uses the line “The tide rises and the tide falls” four different times. This is an example of repetition to get an emotion or point across. In this case the line shows emotion and made me feel excited when the tide rises like there was something more just over the horizon and then let done when it falls like all hope is gone. Another part of the poem that is repeated is the word call at three separate lines. I think that this is to paint a picture in peoples minds on how the ocean can call out when it crashes against the rocks and when the tide comes in and out it is like it’s telling you something. The poem uses a lot of imagery and it goes back and forth from darkness and happiness. I especially like the line “ The little waves, with their soft, white hands efface the footprints in the sand,” this line is a metaphor in that the white part of the waves are acting as hands wiping, ironically, footprints off the sand. Overall, this poem was packed full of Romanticism and it was a good poem to paint a picture in my mind.

8:28 PM  
Blogger Jordan L said...

After the Storm

His hand feels soft and warm,
Simple and tender securely over mine,
The waves crash down after the storm,
Becoming finally settled after passing time.

The sun shines brilliantly over life today,
Even though darkness takes over soon
It was angry once that it couldn’t have its say,
But it had to learn to share with the moon.

The snow doesn’t like the green that covers the ground,
It wants white to only be shown, so it blizzards violently
It’s cold and harsh, not one green grass can be found
The snow regrets and has remorse, so it forms a white blanket and sits silently.

9:19 PM  
Blogger mattheww said...

In the poem "The Tide Rises, The Tide Falls" by Henry Longfellow, I think the theme would be living each day to its fullest. This is evident through Longfellow stating that "the day returns, but nevermore returns the traveler to the shore". Longfellow is saying that each day is different, and what you do one day you may never do again. You must live each day to its fullest, because once a day is gone, you will never get it again. The image of the traveler is used as a metaphor for all people, they leave their days experiences (in this poem, the beach) and never return to experience that again.

7:53 AM  
Blogger PatrickW said...

"The Tide Rises, The Tide Falls" is a poem about life. The statement that he repeats, "the tide rises, the tide falls", applies to how life has its ups and downs. No matter what you do, the tide always rises and it always falls. But there is also always a new morning that follows, bringing the promise of a new day.

8:03 AM  
Blogger MollyR said...

In the poem “The Tide Rises, The Tide Falls” by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, there is a lot of repetition. The author repeats the line, “The Tide Rises, The Tide Fall” four different times. This may be because he wants to get a point across. Since the author repeats this line so much, it really makes the reader think about what it means. In this poem, tide is a metaphor for life. This line is saying that sometimes in life, a person may be struggling a lot, and really down in the dumps. Other times in life, everything may be going great. The author writes “Darkness settles on roofs and walls / But the sea, the sea in darkness calls”. Even when life is going horrible and “darkness settles”, there is always a little bit of hope. As the poem says, “the sea in darkness calls”. This poem also had a rhyme scheme. The author rhymes falls, calls, walls, and stalls. He also might have done this to emphasize the main rhyme of the poem.

12:41 PM  
Blogger Brittany F said...

The waves crash and fall
Slowly unfolding out of their tight ball
It’s hard to be tightly wound all of the time
Going through the motions without reason or rhyme
The sand is safely engulfing your feet
Making you relax and slowing your heart beat
The sun wraps its rays closely on your shoulders
Just to make sure your insecure body doesn’t grow colder
The moon falls into place
And like every ending day the stars follow at the same pace

2:03 PM  
Blogger danielle s said...

Time is Sparse

Like the sun rising and falling
You slip further away from thee,
The labor is done but you still remain,
Your reason for staying is confusion to the brain,

The time I have is eternity,
Savored like a toy to an unfortunate child,
Searching for what was once real,
That is lost and cannot be found,

Night has come the darkness has settled,
The truth is upfront our time has passed,
To the new day and love that lasts.

2:35 PM  
Blogger Jeff B. said...

In the poem "The Tide Rises, The Tide Falls" by Henry Longfellow, the main theme is how days continue to come and go, without anything changing. He says the sun comes up, and then eventually it goes down and it turns to darkness, which portrays the imagery of this poem. Another part of the poem that describes imagery is when he says "...efface the foot prints in the sands," which is portraying how the sea will always wash the footprints away, and new footprints will come. He also uses the image of a traveler walking towards the town, portraying that the days will come and go, and will always have a new chance to start new days.

3:14 PM  
Blogger umbertok said...

The poem “Cross of Snow” by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow is about the remorse of losing a loved one. The poem rhymes opposite words like Night and light to portray a bleak and abysmal mood. The author rhymes dead with head. Which is sort of opposites because, you don’t need your head if you’re dead. All in all, I dislike this poem it’s boring and bland.

3:44 PM  
Blogger umbertok said...

Did I get a misprint? Or am I the only one that got the poem "Cross on Snow" by Henry longfellow? What is this "The tide Rises, THe Tide Falls" about?

3:47 PM  
Blogger Alyssa W. said...

I decided to try and write a poem and this is how it turned out. I am not sure how much of a romantic poem it is but I tried.

There’s a girl
She stares out the window,
Looking onto the rain.
Just listen.
Hear the pitter-patter against the windowsill.
Watch the tree leaves tango in the wind.
Flash! Boom!
The lightning and thunder battle
She copies the rain, tears roll down her cheeks.
Pitter-patter…
Flash! Boom!
…Just listen.

3:54 PM  
Blogger Michael M. said...

The poem, "The Tide Rises", the Tide Falls, by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, exemplifies Romanticism. I think that the poem means, like Matt, living life to the fullest. I also like what Emilyk said about each day a person is able to start over and live their life, with a clean slate. The poem’s main idea is about nature, and it uses soft and gentle words which is a main element to romantic poetry. There is a rhyme scheme used with words that tie nature and people together like “roofs and walls” to “darkness calls”, “brown” to “town” and “hands” to “sands. There is also repetition of the title at the end of every stanza to make a point.

4:42 PM  
Blogger hadley b said...

In the poem “The Tide Rises the Tide Falls” by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, I believe he could be trying to say that after every days end, tomorrow will still come to amaze you of its beauty. At the end of the day the beach may be covered with the traveler’s footprints, but when the tide rises, it washes away all evidence that some one had once been there. Then the tide falls to show the untouched sand. It is also the start of a new day with a new beginning.

5:14 PM  
Blogger kylek said...

In the poem "The Cross of Snow", Henry Wadsworth Longfellow uses iambic pentameter. It's rhyme scheme is abbaabbacdecde and some of the words are antonyms. Longfellow uses imagery such as, "The night-lamp casts a halo of pale light," which compares the night-lamps light to an angel. When Longfellow describes a mountain with a cross of snow on it's side I picture another imagery or metaphor. He also adds emotion in the final line,"And seasons, changeless since the day she died." I believe that the theme of this poem is about someone he might have lost, like a wife, to a fire as explained in this line, "Never through fire was martyrdom led." This passage I believe explains my thought.

5:59 PM  
Blogger Lizzie A said...

I chose to write a Romatice poem, so here is my best shot:

Fiery Fury

Fire melts away my serenity,
Until there is nothing left.
I have no peace, not when he is there,
I feel my calm slip away.
Frustration fills me from top to bottom,
My fury fed by the fire sends me boiling over.
I have not patience,
Mot since be burned it all away.
His fire caught me,
And now it consumes me.
I once had control,
But he cured me of that.
I am drowning is his fire,
As it burns my peace away.
Frustration will fill me,
Until he is gone,
Or until the fire completely consumes me.

6:37 PM  
Blogger Lizzie A said...

I am sorry I misspelled not, on my previous blog it says "mot" but I meant "not".

6:40 PM  
Blogger JohnM said...

I think that in the poem “The Cross of Snow”, Henry Longfellow might be expressing the feelings of the death of a family member like his mother or grandmother, as in the line “A gentle face—the face of one long died…” I think that he remembers his loving feeling that he had for his deceased family member. I think that Longfellow was trying to convey the fact that his relative had made her way to heaven by having a sinless soul, as in the line, “…and soul more white/Never through martyrdom of fire has led to its repose.” He uses some imagery there, specifically her “white soul” to portray her spotless and genuine spirit. I don’t understand what Longfellow meant by the cross on the side of the mountain. I suppose that Longfellow may be very distressed about the death of his family member, and doesn’t even recognize the change of the seasons anymore (I think?) But, no offence Jake, but I liked this poem, even the part I didn’t understand.

7:08 PM  
Blogger shadeh said...

In the poem “the Tide Rises, The Tide Falls” by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, various techniques that create a Romanticism piece are involved. For example, there are a few nature references, which is a big clue this is a Romantic poem. The descriptions of the ocean and the tide are a few examples. Also, there is a lot emotion expressed in the poem which is another big sign of Romanticism. From a few lines of darkness to a complete reverse to a happier side. Many poetic techniques are incorporated in the poem from lines with great imagery, to a rhyme scheme and even repetition. In the poem the words “The tide rises and the tide falls” are used in various places. This technique is a way of leaving readers with a strong memory of the poem. A bit of symbolism is also used because it uses the image of a traveler to describe the essence of days going by.

7:22 PM  
Blogger shadeh said...

In the poem “the Tide Rises, The Tide Falls” by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, various techniques that create a Romanticism piece are involved. For example, there are a few nature references, which is a big clue this is a Romantic poem. The descriptions of the ocean and the tide are a few examples. Also, there is a lot emotion expressed in the poem which is another big sign of Romanticism. From a few lines of darkness to a complete reverse to a happier side. Many poetic techniques are incorporated in the poem from lines with great imagery, to a rhyme scheme and even repetition. In the poem the words “The tide rises and the tide falls” are used in various places. This technique is a way of leaving readers with a strong memory of the poem. A bit of symbolism is also used because it uses the image of a traveler to describe the essence of days going by.

7:22 PM  
Blogger keithw said...

Far off into the Stars,
He fly's faster and swifter,
As he passes by lonely mars,
He thinks about the player.

That he could of been,
But he knows its in the past,
Because he lost the men,
that were quick and fast.

He looks back on his misfortune,
and cries about it every night,
While the work load comes by the ton,
But he knows that he will never forget the fight.

7:25 PM  
Blogger Scott A said...

In the poem “The Cross of Snow” Longfellow is describing the death of a loved one. He rhymes light and night, he might be showing how even light does not cheer him up any more. The love of his life is no longer there. He shows this in the line, “and seasons, changeless since the day she died.”

7:44 PM  
Blogger GaryH said...

In the poem "The Tide Rises, The Tide Falls" by Henry Longfellow, I believe the theme that is trying to be shown, is to be living each day to its fullest. Longfellow says that each day can and will change, and you want one day, you might never have the chance to get again. Each day has to be lived as if it is your last because you never know when it will be. The traveler is used as a metaphor it represents all people, they leave their days with chances that will never happen to them again. So you must live life the best you can with both its up and downs.

8:10 PM  
Blogger JasonW1 said...

In the poem "The Tide Rises, The Tide Falls" by Henry Longfellow, the main theme of the poem is that with every day comes another day and a new beginning. No matter what happened one day, the next day you start out with a clean slat. Mr. Longfellow tried to get across this message by comparing it to the sand on the sea. During the day the sand has footprints in it. But the tides rise and fall during the night which gets rid of the footprints, and the next morning the beach is nice and smooth. Longfellow uses repitiion in his poem when he repeats several times "the tide rised, the tide falls". His message when doing this is that with every day, follows another.

8:13 PM  
Blogger jessie-w said...

Strike.
An aroma of sulfur. A faint flicker of a flame.
Dark casting shadows dancing across the moon inflicted sky.
Crickets play their melodies,
As the water ripples her harmony.
Comfortable chill on this dead infested night.

Numb.
A state of just being.
No darkness, no light, all’s grey.
The stars are lost,
The intertwining of the branches engulf the dream.
Breath, a sigh of life.

Drizzle.
Acorn water droplets. A sudden storm.
Drenched by the rain running from the wheat.
Thunder clashes with lighting.
The sky’s great debate.
Passion on this unexpected night.

8:24 PM  
Blogger Cassy H said...

This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

8:59 PM  
Blogger AmandaF said...

In the poem, "The Cross of Snow" by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, the overall theme is sadness. The poem talks about losing someone very close and the remorse he feels. He uses examples like, "here in the room she died" and "the face of one long dead" to fully describe his pain.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow uses iambic pentameter as the rhyme scheme for the poem. I think he chose this type of rhyme scheme because it doesn't make the poem too rhymey, it adds just enough to keep the reader interested.
Overall, this is a very sad poem about grief, sadness and death, but it is a great poem. The words are very meaningful and descriptive.

9:02 PM  
Blogger Cassy H said...

I agree with Emily about the poem. She made a good point about life and being able to start your life over even though you may have had a bumpy ride. A quote that stuck out to me was "the tide rises, the tide falls". He says this many times, and is an expression that he wanted to get across. This goes along with the structure of the poem and emphasizing words. The traveler also stuck in my mind. He supported my idea of starting a new life. This is because he leaves and comes back again, maybe to start over.

9:04 PM  
Blogger BillM said...

The main idea being exposed in the poem “The Tide Rises, The Tide Falls” by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow is the thought of new beginnings each day and that there’s always tomorrow. I relate it to somebody who is having a bad day that should try to start the next day with a positive attitude because like the prints in the sand being effaced, most things that happen a day before are not worth continuing to dwell on or think about and will most likely be forgotten. What was done is done and one should keep looking forward and not live in the past, but live life to the fullest by being upbeat and happy.

9:26 PM  
Blogger MaureenM said...

The Way it Used to be

I want away
Away from it all
Nature is the answer
To the calmness of it all

I want away
Away from my busy life
I want woods
And a calm creek

I want away
Away from you
It used to be woods
But now it a city full of lights

I want away
Away from decisions
I want no thoughts
But just you and me away from it all.

9:08 PM  
Blogger Philip M. said...

In the poem “the Tide Rises, the Tide Falls” by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, I related the traveler to a memory. This memory came from an experience that was valued; maybe this experience was a one time thing. The true meaning I got from this poem was to live life to its fullest. As long as you/the traveler are able to look on the bright side of things, and experience all that is given. The memories will be fulfilling. In one moment you may experience something never to be experienced again, and with that memory you will be able to look upon that experience. We only live once, so why not take your time.

7:46 PM  
Blogger Russel said...

I have been visiting various blogs for my term papers writing research. I have found your blog to be quite useful. Keep updating your blog with valuable information... Regards

8:18 PM  

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